Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center - Health Library

Reducing Your Risk of Nutritional Anemia

Eating the right foods will give you enough nutrients to lower your risk. Ask a dietitian to help you plan meals. You may be able to take vitamins and supplements if your risk is higher. Don’t take them until your doctor says it’s okay to do so.

REFERENCES:

Anemia. American Society of Hematology website. Available at: http://www.hematology.org/Patients/Anemia. Accessed October 15, 2018.

Anemia. National Heart, Blood and Lung Institute website. Available at: https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/anemia. Accessed October 15, 2018.

Iron deficiency anemia in adults. EBSCO DynaMed Plus website. Available at:http://www.dynamed.com/topics/dmp~AN~T115986/Iron-deficiency-anemia-in-adults. Updated August 16, 2018. Accessed October 15, 2018.

Iron deficiency in children (infancy through adolescence). EBSCO DynaMed Plus website. Available at:http://www.dynamed.com/topics/dmp~AN~T435307/Iron-deficiency-in-children-infancy-through-adolescence. Updated November 21, 2016. Accessed October 15, 2018.

Overview of decreased erythropoiesis. Merck Manual Professional Version website. Available at: https://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/hematology-and-oncology/anemias-caused-by-deficient-erythropoiesis/overview-of-decreased-erythropoiesis. Updated July 2018. Accessed October 15, 2018.

Last reviewed September 2018 by EBSCO Medical Review Board Marcin Chwistek, MD  Last Updated: 10/15/2018