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Risk Factors for Sickle Cell Disease

A risk factor is something that increases your likelihood of getting a disease or condition.

The only way to get sickle cell disease is to inherit 2 defective genes that cause sickle cell diseases. However, the following factors make a baby more likely to be born with sickle cell disease:

Genetic Factors

Children who receive one abnormal gene from each of their parents will have sickle cell disease. Children who receive one abnormal gene and one normal gene usually have no symptoms and are said to have sickle cell trait. They can pass their abnormal gene on to their own children, which, if combined with a sickle cell gene from the other parent, will cause a child to have sickle cell disease.

Ethnic Background

The majority of people with sickle cell disease are of sub-Saharan African descent. Other people at risk for sickle cell disease are those whose ancestors came from South America, Cuba, Central America, Saudi Arabia, India, Turkey, Greece, and Italy.

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References:

Sickle cell disease. Kids Health—Nemours Foundation website. Available at:
...(Click grey area to select URL)
Updated September 2012. Accessed July 1, 2013.
Sickle cell disease in adults and adolescents. EBSCO DynaMed Plus website. Available at: http://www.dynamed.... Updated October 4, 2016. Accessed October 5, 2016.
Sickle cell disease in infants and children. EBSCO DynaMed Plus website. Available at: http://www.dynamed.... Updated September 20, 2016. Accessed October 5, 2016.
Sickle cell trait. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. Available at:
...(Click grey area to select URL)
Updated September 14, 2015. Accessed December 13, 2016.
Last reviewed December 2016 by Marcin Chwistek, MD
Last Updated: 5/20/2015

 

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