Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center - Health Library

Talking to Your Doctor About Menstrual Disorders

You have your own health history. Talk with your doctor about your risk factors and background with menstrual disorders. Talk openly and often with your doctor. It will help you make the best choices for you and your family.

Tips for Gathering Information

Here are some tips that will help you talk to your doctor:

  • Bring someone with you. It helps to have another person hear what is said and think of questions to ask.
  • Write down your questions so you don't forget them.
  • Write down the answers you get. Make sure you grasp what you are hearing. Ask for help, if needed.
  • Don't be afraid to ask your questions. Ask where you can learn more. You have a right to know.

Questions to Ask Your Doctor

About Menorrhagia (Heavy Bleeding)

  • What could be causing my heavy bleeding?
  • What kinds of tests should I have?
  • How serious is my problem?
  • Where can I learn more?

About Your Risk of Getting Complications of Menorrhagia

  • Am I at risk for anemia?
  • Do I need to be worried about infertility?
  • Are there any other problems I should be worried about?

About Treatments for Menorrhagia

  • What can be done to treat heavy bleeding?
  • Are there medicines that can help me? If so,
    • What benefits can I expect?
    • What side effects can I expect?
  • Are there any surgeries that can help? If so:
    • What benefits can I expect?
    • What are the risks?
  • Are there any alternative or complementary therapies that may help?
  • Is there anything else I can do to reduce the bleeding?

About Amenorrhea (Lack of Menstruation)

  • Why don't I have periods?
  • What kinds of tests should I have?
  • How serious is my problem?
  • Where can I learn more?

About Your Risk of Getting Complications of Amenorrhea

  • Am I at risk for bone loss and osteoporosis?
  • Do I need to be worried about infertility?
  • Are there any other problems I should worry about?

About Treatments for Amenorrhea

  • How is this treated?
  • Are there medicines that can help me? If so:
    • What benefits can I expect?
    • What side effects can I expect?
  • Is there anything I can do to make my periods regular?
  • Are there any alternative or complementary therapies that may help?

About Your Outlook

  • Will my problem get better?
  • What should I do if this problem comes back?

About Lifestyle Changes

  • What changes can I make to help my problem?
  • Do I need to do anything about my eating, workouts, weight, stress, or other habits?
REFERENCES:

Abnormal uterine bleeding. EBSCO DynaMed Plus website. Available at:http://www.dynamed.com/topics/dmp~AN~T361089/Abnormal-uterine-bleeding. Updated August 24, 2018. Accessed October 29, 2018.

Amenorrhea. EBSCO DynaMed Plus website. Available at:http://www.dynamed.com/topics/dmp~AN~T116009/Amenorrhea. Updated January 16, 2018. Accessed October 29, 2018.

Klein DA, Poth MA. Amenorrhea: an approach to diagnosis and management. Am Fam Physician. 2013 Jun 1;87(11):781-788.

Menstruation and the menstrual cycle fact sheet. Office on Women's Health website. Available at: http://www.womenshealth.gov/publications/our-publications/fact-sheet/menstruation.html. Updated April 25, 2018. Accessed October 29, 2018.

Tips for talking to your doctor. American Academy of Family Physicians Family Doctor website. Available at: http://familydoctor.org/familydoctor/en/healthcare-management/working-with-your-doctor/tips-for-talking-to-your-doctor.html. Updated May 2014. Accessed September 15, 2016.

Last reviewed September 2018 by EBSCO Medical Review BoardBeverly Siegal, MD, FACOG  Last Updated: 10/29/2018