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Reducing Your Risk of Lipid Disorders

Related Media: Managing High Cholesterol: Cooking Healthy Meals

Some risk factors for lipid disorders like family history or genetics can not be changed. Fortunately, there are many lifestyle risk factors that you can control. Modifications include:

Eat a Diet Low in Saturated and Trans Fat and Cholesterol

Keep your diet low in saturated and trans fat and cholesterol. Look for foods rich in whole grains. Make fruits and vegetables a major part of your diet.

General guidelines include:

  • Limit calories from saturated fat. They should be less than 7% of your total calorie intake. Limit cholesterol intake to less than 200 mg per day.
  • Have fruits and/or vegetables with every meal.
  • Eat oily fish that are high in omega-3 fatty acids twice a week, and limit excess carbohydrates.

Exercise Regularly

Exercise can help decrease LDL and increase HDL cholesterol levels. Choose exercises you enjoy and will make a regular part of your day. Strive to maintain an exercise program that keeps you fit and at a healthful weight. For most people, this could include walking or participating in another aerobic activity for 30 minutes every day.

Check with your doctor before starting any new exercise program.

Lose Excess Weight

Excess weight is associated with higher levels of LDLs. Remember weight loss takes time and there is no quick fix. Give yourself time to make adjustments to your diet. Portion control, combined with healthy food choices, will get you started on the right track. A dietitian may help you develop effective meal plans.

If you need help getting started, check the http://www.choosemyplate.gov or http://eatright.org websites.

Drink Alcohol Only in Moderation

Alcohol can raise triglyceride levels. Moderation means 2 or fewer alcoholic beverages per day for women and 3 or fewer for men. One drink equals 12 ounces of beer or 4 ounces of wine or 1 ounce of 100-proof spirits.

Quit Smoking

Smoking lowers HDL (good cholesterol) levels. If you are a smoker, consider a smoking cessation program or cessation aids to help you stop. Quitting smoking can improve your overall cholesterol picture and your overall health.

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References:

Hypercholesterolemia. EBSCO DynaMed Plus website. Available at: http://www.dynamed.... Updated December 19, 2017. Accessed March 13, 2017.
Hypertriglyceridemia. EBSCO DynaMed Plus website. Available at: http://www.dynamed.... Updated February 2, 2017. Accessed March 13, 2017.
Prevention and treatment of high cholesterol. American Heart Association website. Available at:
...(Click grey area to select URL)
Updated August 30, 2016. Accessed March 13, 2017.
Last reviewed March 2017 by Marcin Chwistek, MD
Last Updated: 3/15/2015

 

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