CRDAMC Homepage | CRDAMC Library Phone #: (254) 288-8366 | CRDAMC Library Fax #: (254) 288-8368

Search Health Library

Diagnosis of Hypertension

Hypertension is often diagnosed during a routine visit to your doctor. Blood pressure is measured using a cuff around your arm and a device called a sphygmomanometer. You may be asked to sit quietly for 5 minutes before checking your blood pressure.

Placement of Blood Pressure Cuff

Copyright © Nucleus Medical Media, Inc.

For most people, it takes more than one high blood pressure reading to diagnose high blood pressure. If your blood pressure reading is high, a second measurement will be done a few minutes later. If your blood pressure is still high, you will probably be asked to come back for repeat blood pressure checks. High blood pressure diagnosis will be made when you have readings over 140/90 mmHg during 3 separate visits.

Sometimes people become anxious at the doctor's office. This may result in a higher than normal blood pressure reading. You may be asked to measure your blood pressure at home or in another location.

In some cases, you may be asked to wear an ambulatory blood pressure monitor. This device measures your blood pressure regularly throughout the day as you go about your activities. It is usually worn for 24 hours, even while sleeping.

PreviousNext

References:

How high blood pressure is diagnosed. American Heart Association website. Available at:
...(Click grey area to select URL)
Updated September 16, 2016. Accessed September 20, 2016.
How is high blood pressure diagnosed? National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute website. Available at:
...(Click grey area to select URL)
Updated September 10, 2015. Accessed September 20, 2016.
Hypertension. EBSCO DynaMed Plus website. Available at: http://www.dynamed.com/topics/dmp~AN~T115345/Hypertension. Updated August 29, 2016. Accessed September 20, 2016.
Hypertension diagnosis and treatment (guideline). Institute for Clinical Systems Improvement website. Available at: https://www.icsi.org/guidelines__more/catalog_guidelines_and_more/catalog_guidelines/catalog_cardiovascular_guidelines/hypertension. Updated November 2014. Accessed September 20, 2016.
Last reviewed September 2017 by Michael J. Fucci, DO, FACC
Last Updated: 11/20/2017

 

EBSCO Information Services is fully accredited by URAC. URAC is an independent, nonprofit health care accrediting organization dedicated to promoting health care quality through accreditation, certification and commendation.

This content is reviewed regularly and is updated when new and relevant evidence is made available. This information is neither intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider prior to starting any new treatment or with questions regarding a medical condition.

To send comments or feedback to our Editorial Team regarding the content please email us at healthlibrarysupport@ebsco.com. Our Health Library Support team will respond to your email request within 2 business days.

Health Library: Editorial Policy | Privacy Policy | Terms and Conditions | Support
36000 Darnall Loop Fort Hood, Texas 76544-4752 | Phone: (254) 288-8000