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Reducing Your Risk of Endometriosis

Endometriosis often begins in the teen years and develops slowly over the course of a woman’s life. Its causes are not fully understood, and genetic factors are believed to play a primary role in its occurrence. There is little evidence that endometriosis can be prevented; however, some lifestyle changes may help lower your risk.

Exercise Regularly

Recent studies suggest that regular exercise may decrease your risk of endometriosis. One study found that women who exercise regularly, started exercising before age 15, and exercise more than 7 hours a week, are at lower risk for the disease.

For more information on starting a regular exercise program, click here.

Avoid Excessive Alcohol and Caffeine

Women who drink large amounts of alcohol or beverages with caffeine appear to have an increased risk for endometriosis. This may be due to the fact that both of these substances increase estrogen levels in the body.

For more information on decreasing your caffeine intake, click here.

Consider Oral Contraceptives

Long term-use of oral contraceptives may decrease your risk of endometriosis. This is probably because they regulate menses and typically reduce the amount of bleeding during menstruation.

The use of oral contraceptives to reduce the risk of endometriosis is a decision that should be made with the advice of your healthcare provider. If oral contraceptives are being considered as an option for birth control, this additional benefit may be helpful in making a decision.

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References:

Endometriosis. EBSCO DynaMed Plus website. Available at: http://www.dynamed.... Updated May 25, 2017. Accessed September 12, 2017.
What is endometriosis? Endo-Online website. Available at:
...(Click grey area to select URL)
Accessed September 12, 2017.
Last reviewed September 2017 by EBSCO Medical Review Board Beverly Siegal, MD, FACOG
Last Updated: 9/17/2014

 

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