CRDAMC Homepage | CRDAMC Library Phone #: (254) 288-8366 | CRDAMC Library Fax #: (254) 288-8368

Search Health Library

Symptoms of Hearing Loss

Hearing loss usually comes on gradually but may develop suddenly. The symptoms may include:

  • Decreased ability to hear any of the following:
    • Higher pitched sounds
    • Lower pitched sounds
    • All sounds
    • Speech when there is background noise
  • Lightheadedness or a sensation of spinning known as vertigo
  • Ringing, hissing, or roaring sounds in the ears—tinnitus
  • Some sounds seem too loud
  • Problems with balance
  • Ear pain
  • Feeling of fullness or pressure in the ear (with earwax or fluid)

Some people may not realize that they have hearing loss, especially if it develops over a number of years or if it happens in 1 ear. Common experiences where people begin to notice changes include:

  • Difficulty hearing on the telephone
  • Difficulty understanding speech when there is background noise, like in a restaurant, crowd, or at a party
  • Difficulty following a conversation when 2 or more people are talking at once
  • Misunderstanding what other people are saying and responding inappropriately
  • Misunderstanding words that sound similar
  • Asking people to repeat what they said or speak more slowly, loudly, and clearly
  • Difficulty understanding the speech of women and children, which is higher pitched
  • Getting complaints from others that you have the TV or radio volume too high
  • Withdrawing from conversations because you have trouble hearing

Symptoms of deafness or hearing loss in infants that may be noted:

  • 0-3 months:
    • Does not react to loud sounds or voices
    • Does not turn head toward you when you talk
  • 3-6 months:
    • Does not turn toward a new sound
    • Does not respond to changes in tone of voice
    • Does not imitate own voice or make babbling or cooing sounds
    • Does not respond to rattles or musical toys
  • 6-10 months:
    • Does not respond to own name, another person’s voice, or telephone ringing
    • Does not make babbling sounds or know words for common things
    • Does not look at things when someone talks about them
  • 10-15 months:
    • Does not experiment with own voice
    • Does not imitate easy words or sounds
    • Does not focus on common objects or familiar people when asked
    • Delayed speech
  • 15-18 months:
    • Does not know or say even a small number of words
    • Does not follow simple directions
    • Other evidence of delayed speech
PreviousNext

References:

Hearing loss. Healthy Children—American Academy of Pediatrics website. Available at: https://www.healthychildren.org/English/health-issues/conditions/ear-nose-throat/Pages/Hearing-Loss.aspx. Updated November 21, 2015. Accessed August 17, 2016.
Hearing loss. NIH SeniorHealth website. Available at:
...(Click grey area to select URL)
Accessed August 17, 2016.
Hearing loss and older adults. National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders website. Available at:
...(Click grey area to select URL)
Updated June 3, 2016. Accessed August 17, 2016.
Last reviewed September 2017 by Michael Woods, MD, FAAP
Last Updated: 9/17/2014

 

EBSCO Information Services is fully accredited by URAC. URAC is an independent, nonprofit health care accrediting organization dedicated to promoting health care quality through accreditation, certification and commendation.

This content is reviewed regularly and is updated when new and relevant evidence is made available. This information is neither intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider prior to starting any new treatment or with questions regarding a medical condition.

To send comments or feedback to our Editorial Team regarding the content please email us at healthlibrarysupport@ebsco.com. Our Health Library Support team will respond to your email request within 2 business days.

Health Library: Editorial Policy | Privacy Policy | Terms and Conditions | Support
36000 Darnall Loop Fort Hood, Texas 76544-4752 | Phone: (254) 288-8000