Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center - Health Library

Health Library Home>Conditions InDepth>Article

Reducing Your Risk of Chlamydia

Any person who is sexually active can be infected with chlamydia. Abstaining from oral, vaginal, and anal sex is the most assured way to remain uninfected. However if you are sexually active, there are steps you can take to help reduce your risk of chlamydia.

  • Have a mutually monogamous relationship with an uninfected partner.
  • Always use a latex condom during all sexual activity. Proper and consistent use of condoms is important in order for them to be effective.
  • Get recommended screening tests, especially if you are a woman under the age of 25 or are not in a monogamous relationship. Sexually active young men should consider screening , although there is no specific guideline.
  • Behavioral counseling may be advised if you are a sexually active person at increased risk for infection.
  • Avoid risky behaviors, such as unprotected or anonymous sex.
  • Know your status and your partner's. Openly discuss sexually transmitted infections (STI)s.
  • Talk to your doctor about your risk factors and any concerns you have about STDs.

Do not let the cost of healthcare deter you from knowing your status. Many local clinics and health facilities offer free screening tests.

REFERENCES:

Sexually transmitted diseases treatment guidelines. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. Available at: https://www.cdc.gov/std/tg2015/default.htm. Accessed January 29, 2021.

Chlamydia—CDC fact sheet (detailed). Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. Available at: https://www.cdc.gov/std/chlamydia/STDFact-chlamydia-detailed.htm. Accessed January 29, 2021.

Chlamydia genital infection. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at:https://www.dynamed.com/topics/dmp~AN~T114223/Chlamydia-genital-infection. Accessed January 29, 2021.

Mishori R, McClaskey EL, WinklerPrins VJ. Chlamydia trachomatis infections: Screening, diagnosis, and management. Am Fam Physician. 2012;86(12):1127-1132.

Last reviewed March 2020 by EBSCO Medical Review Board David L. Horn, MD, FACP  Last Updated: 1/29/2021