Home
Search in�� ��for��
 
Resources
Career Center
New Hospital Update
Learn More About MCI
Bill Payment
Upcoming Events
Find a Physician
Press Releases
Maps and Directions
Visiting Hours
Medical Services
Specialty Programs and Services
Volunteer Services
H2U
Birthing Center Tours
Clinics
Family Care of Eastern Jackson County
Jackson County Medical Group
Family & Friends
Virtual Body
Virtual Cheercards
Web Babies
Decision Tools
Self-Assessment Tools
Natural and Alternative Treatments Main Index
Health Sources
Cancer InDepth
Heart Care Center
HealthDay News
Wellness Centers
Aging and Health
Alternative Health
Sports and Fitness
Food and Nutrition
Men's Health
Mental Health
Kids' and Teens' Health
Healthy Pregnancy
Medications
Travel and Health
Women's Health
Genus MD
Genus MD
Physician Websites
Legal Disclaimers
Nondiscrimination
Privacy Notice



Send This Page To A Friend
Print This Page

Natural and Alternative Treatments Index Page | Herbs & Supplements:

Salt Bush

What Is Salt Bush Used for Today? | Dosage | Safety Issues | References

Atriplex halimus


Principal Proposed Uses
  • Diabetes


Salt bush is a shrub that grows throughout the Mediterranean region, in the Middle East, northern Africa, and southern Europe. As its name suggests, it is especially common in areas where the soil is saline. Salt bush is a nutritious plant, high in protein, vitamins C, A, and D, and minerals such as chromium. It is also fairly tasty—shepherds as well as their flocks enjoy eating salt bush.

 

What Is Salt Bush Used for Today?

Salt bush may prove useful in the treatment of type 2 (non-insulin-dependent or adult onset) diabetes. This idea came to the attention of medical researchers in 1964, when they discovered that a rodent called the sand rat ( Psammomys obesus) is highly susceptible to developing diabetes.1  Yet wild sand rats, which regularly consume salt bush, never show any signs of diabetes—they tend to develop it in response to being fed regular laboratory food! As a result, scientists have explored the possibility that salt bush has an antidiabetic effect.

The results of animal studies and preliminary human trials suggest that salt bush does indeed have antidiabetic effects.2-6  However, while these studies are certainly intriguing, only double-blind, placebo-controlled studies can prove a treatment effective, and none have yet been reported. (For information on why this type of study is essential, see Why Does This Database Rely on Double-Blind Studies?) For this reason, the use of salt bush for diabetes remains highly speculative.

Some animal researchers speculate that the effect of salt bush (if, indeed, it has one) may be partly due to the chromium it contains.7  Considerable evidence indicates that chromium supplementation can improve blood sugar control, especially in type 2 diabetes. However, there could be other active ingredients in salt bush as well.

 

Dosage

No standard dosage of salt bush has been established.

Warning: Diabetes is a serious disease that should be treated only under medical supervision. Salt bush cannot be used as a substitute for insulin. Blood sugar levels should also be closely monitored. For more information, see Safety Issues.

 

Safety Issues

As a plant food commonly consumed by animals and humans, salt bush appears to be relatively safe. However, no comprehensive safety testing of salt bush has been performed. For this reason, it should not be used by young children, pregnant or nursing women, or people with severe liver or kidney disease.

Keep in mind that if salt bush is effective, the result might be excessive lowering of blood sugar levels. For this reason, people with diabetes who take salt bush should do so only under a physician's supervision.8,9 


References [ + ]

1. Adler JH, Lazarovici G, Marton M, et al. The diabetic response of weanling sand rats ( Psammomys obesus) to diets containing different concentrations of salt bush ( Atriplex halimus). Diabetes Res. 1986;3:169–171.

2. Adler JH, Lazarovici G, Marton M, et al. The diabetic response of weanling sand rats ( Psammomys obesus) to diets containing different concentrations of salt bush ( Atriplex halimus). Diabetes Res. 1986;3:169–171.

3. Aharonson Z, Shani J, Sulman FG. Hypoglycaemic effect of the salt bush ( Atriplex halimus)—a feeding source of the sand rat ( Psammomys obesus). Diabetologia. 1969;5:379–383.

4. Shani J, Ahronson Z, Sulman FG, et al. Insulin-potentiating effect of salt bush ( Atriplex halimus) ashes. Isr J Med Sci. 1972;8:757–758.

5. Stern E. Successful use of Atriplex halimus in the treatment of type 2 diabetic patients: a preliminary study. Zamenhoff Medical Center, Tel Aviv, 1989.

6. Earon G, Stern E, and Lavosky H. Successful use of Atriplex halimus in the treatment of type 2 diabetic patients. Controlled clinical research report on the subject of Atriplex. Unpublished study conducted at the Hebrew University, Jerusalem, 1989.

7. Shani J, Ahronson Z, Sulman FG, et al. Insulin-potentiating effect of salt bush ( Atriplex halimus) ashes. Isr J Med Sci. 1972;8:757–758.

8. Stern E. Successful use of Atriplex halimus in the treatment of type 2 diabetic patients: a preliminary study. Zamenhoff Medical Center, Tel Aviv, 1989.

9. Earon G, Stern E, and Lavosky H. Successful use of Atriplex halimus in the treatment of type 2 diabetic patients. Controlled clinical research report on the subject of Atriplex. Unpublished study conducted at the Hebrew University, Jerusalem, 1989.



Last reviewed December 2015 by EBSCO CAM Review Board
Last Updated: 12/15/2015

Back to Top

Health References
Health Conditions
Therapeutic Centers


Copyright � 1999-2007
ehc.com; All rights reserved.
Terms & Conditions of Use
Privacy Statement
Medical Center of Independence
17203 E. 23rd St.
Independence,� MO� 64057
Telephone: (816) 478-5000