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Chlamydia

Pronounced: kluh-MID-ee-uh

 

Definition

Chlamydia is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections (STIs).

 

Causes    TOP

Bacteria from an infected sex partner causes the infection. This can happen during oral, vaginal, or anal sex.

 

Risk Factors    TOP

The infection is most common among people under 24 years old. It is also more common in people who are Black or Hispanic.

Other things that raise your risk are:

  • Having sex
  • Prior STIs
  • Having a new sex partner
  • Having more than one sex partner
  • Having a partner with an STI
  • Having sex without a condom
 

Symptoms    TOP

Most people do not have signs of infection. If they do happen, they may be:

In men:

  • Pain when urinating
  • Pus exiting the penis
  • Scrotal pain or swelling

In women:

  • A change in vaginal discharge
  • Pain or bleeding during sex or between periods
  • Belly pain
  • Vaginal redness or pain
  • Pain when urinating

Male Genitourinary System

Prostate Gland

Copyright © Nucleus Medical Media, Inc.

Female Reproductive System Organs

Female Reproductive Organs

Copyright © Nucleus Medical Media, Inc.

 

Diagnosis    TOP

You will be asked about your symptoms and health history. An exam will be done.

You will have these tests:

  • A swab of the penis, cervix, throat, or rectum
  • Urine tests
 

Treatment    TOP

The infection is treated with antibiotics.

To help yourself get better:

  • You and your partner should both get treated. Wait seven days before you have sex again.
  • If you still have signs after taking all your medicine, or if you are pregnant, you may need to be tested again.
  • You should be tested again three months to make sure you have not been reinfected.
 

Prevention    TOP

To lower your chances of getting this infection:

  • Have routine exams for STIs if you are a woman under the age of 25. Sexually active young men should get screened, but there is no guideline.
  • Always use a condom during sex.
  • Abstain from sex.
  • Limit sex to one partner.
RESOURCES:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
http://www.cdc.gov

Office on Women's Health—US Department of Health and Human Services
http://www.womenshealth.gov

CANADIAN RESOURCES:

Health Canada
https://www.canada.ca

The Sex Information & Education Council of Canada
http://sieccan.org

REFERENCES:

2015 Sexually transmitted diseases treatment guidelines. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. Available at:
...(Click grey area to select URL)
Updated January 25, 2017. Accessed August 1, 2018.

Blas MM, Canchihuaman FA, Alva Ie, Hawes SE. Pregnancy outcomes in women infected with Chlamydia trachomatis: a population-based cohort study in Washington State. Sex Transm Infect. 2007;83(4):314-318.

Chlamydia. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. Available at:
...(Click grey area to select URL)
Updated October 31, 2017. Accessed August 1, 2018.

Chlamydia genital infection. EBSCO DynaMed Plus website. Available at: http://www.dynamed.com/topics/dmp~AN~T114223/Chlamydia-genital-infection . Updated August 23, 2017. Accessed August 1, 2018.

Chlamydia fact sheet. Office on Women's Health—US Department of Health and Human Services website. Available at:
...(Click grey area to select URL)
Updated June 14, 2018. Accessed August 1, 2018.

Gottlieb SL, Martin DH, Xu F, Byrne GI, Brunham RC. Summary: The natural history and immunobiology of Chlamydia trachomatis genital infection and implications for Chlamydia control. J Infect Dis. 2010;201 Suppl 2:S190-S204.

Kent CK, Chaw JK, Wong W, et al. Prevalence of rectal, urethral, and pharyngeal chlamydia and gonorrhea detected in 2 clinical settings among men who have sex with men: San Francisco, California, 2003. Clin Infect Dis. 2005;41(1):67-74.

3/17/2015 DynaMed Plus Systematic Literature Surveillance http://www.dynamed.com/topics/dmp~AN~T114223/Chlamydia-genital-infection : LeFevre ML, U.S. Preventive Services Task force. Screening for chlamydia and gonorrhea: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement. Ann Intern Med. 2014;161(12):902-910.



Last reviewed May 2018 by EBSCO Medical Review Board Beverly Siegal, MD, FACOG
Last Updated: 8/1/2018

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