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Diagnosis of Rosacea

Your doctor will ask about your symptoms and medical and family history. A physical exam will be done, including a thorough examination of your skin. The diagnosis can usually be made based on the typical appearance of the rash. In some situations, you may be referred to a doctor specializing in skin problems or eye problems. There are no specific tests to detect rosacea, but some testing may be done to rule out other disorders with similar symptoms. These may include blood tests or a skin biopsy.

The National Rosacea Society's experts have created a system for diagnosing rosacea that includes specific symptoms being present for 3 months or more.

The diagnosis will include identification of the subtype. Knowing the subtype of rosacea can help with a treatment plan. There are 4 subtypes:

Symptoms can vary in severity. It is also possible to have symptoms that fall into more than one subtype.

REFERENCES:

All about rosacea. National Rosacea Society website. Available at: https://www.rosacea.org/patients/allaboutrosacea.php. Accessed December 27, 2017.

Rosacea. EBSCO DynaMed Plus website. Available at:http://www.dynamed.com/topics/dmp~AN~T116224/Rosacea. June 8, 2017. Accessed December 22, 2017.

Rosacea. DermNet New Zealand website. Available at: https://www.dermnetnz.org/topics/rosacea. Updated June 2014. Accessed December 22, 2017.

Rosacea: Diagnosis and treatment. American Academy of Dermatology website. Available at: https://www.aad.org/public/diseases/acne-and-rosacea/rosacea#treatment. Accessed December 22, 2017.

Last reviewed November 2018 by EBSCO Medical Review Board Michael Woods, MD, FAAP  Last Updated: 12/28/2015