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Insulin Pump


Transcript

If you have been diagnosed with Type I or Type II diabetes, you can use an insulin pump to control your blood glucose level.

An insulin pump is a battery-powered device used to deliver rapid-acting insulin to the body through a catheter, replacing the need for periodic injections.

The parts of the device include a battery-powered pump, a disposable reservoir of insulin, and a computer chip programmed to deliver precise dosages.

To help maintain a consistent glucose level, you can program the pump ahead of time for continuous insulin delivery, twenty-four hours a day.

An insulin pump can help you adjust your blood sugar immediately.

You can also program the pump to deliver larger “bolus doses” of insulin right before eating to accommodate (or cover) the amount of carbohydrates you are about to eat.

Once you have determined your glucose level with a glucose meter you can program your pump to send the correct amount of insulin into your body.

Insulin travels from the pump through an “infusion set,” including a flexible tube attached to a soft plastic cannula inserted just under the skin.

Using an insulin pump may help you lead a more flexible lifestyle while helping you maintain a more consistently stable glucose level.

Studies show that regular monitoring and maintenance of glucose levels help prevent long term diabetic complications such as blindness, kidney disease, heart disease and stroke.