Health Library Home>Wellness Centers>Medications>Article

Coping With Blood-Clotting Problems Related to Chemotherapy

 Chemotherapy can affect the bone marrow's ability to make platelets. Platelets are blood cell fragments that help stop bleeding by making your blood clot. If your blood does not have enough platelets, you may bleed or bruise more easily than usual, even without an injury.

Call your doctor if you have any of these symptoms:

Your doctor may check your platelet count often while you are undergoing chemotherapy. If your platelet count falls too low, the doctor may give you a blood or platelet transfusion, or medications to build up the count.

Tips to Help Prevent Problems If Your Platelet Count Is Low

If your platelet count is low, do the following:

RESOURCES:

American Cancer Society
https://www.cancer.org

National Cancer Institute
https://www.cancer.gov

CANADIAN RESOURCES:

BC Cancer Agency
http://www.bccancer.bc.ca

Canadian Cancer Society
http://www.cancer.ca

REFERENCES:

Bleeding or low platelet count. American Cancer Society website. Available at: https://www.cancer.org/treatment/treatments-and-side-effects/physical-side-effects/low-blood-counts/bleeding.html. Updated February 13, 2017. Accessed November 9, 2017.

Chemotherapy and you. National Cancer Institute website. Available at: https://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/coping/chemotherapy-and-you.pdf. Accessed November 9, 2017.

Toxicities of chemotherapeutic agents. EBSCO DynaMed Plus website. Available at:http://www.dynamed.com/topics/dmp~AN~T115935/Toxicities-of-chemotherapeutic-agents. Updated October 23, 2017. Accessed November 9, 2017.

Understanding chemotherapy: a guide for patients and families. American Cancer Society website. Available at: http://www.cancer.org/acs/groups/cid/documents/webcontent/003025-pdf.pdf. Accessed November 9, 2017.

Last reviewed November 2017 by EBSCO Medical Review Board Michael Woods, MD, FAAP  Last Updated: 12/21/2015