Symptoms of Glaucoma

Glaucoma makes it hard to see objects to the side and out of the corner of the eye. A person may feel as though they are looking through a tunnel. Eyesight can worsen until a person becomes blind.

The Eye

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People with open-angle glaucoma often do not have symptoms at first. Vision problems happen as it gets worse. People with angle-closure glaucoma may have some early problems that lead up to an attack.

Glaucoma may cause:

  • Blind spots
  • Blurred eyesight
  • Halos around lights
  • Eye aching or stinging
  • Problems seeing in dim light
  • Problems focusing on close work
  • Problems seeing objects to the side and out of the corner of the eye
  • Tunnel vision

People with angle-closure glaucoma may have these more severe problems that need care right away:

  • Eye pain
  • Facial pain
  • Blurred or cloudy eyesight
  • Redness and swelling of the eye
  • Pupil(s) that do not react to light
  • Swollen eyelids
  • Tearing
  • Nausea or vomiting
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References:

Angle-closure glaucoma. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: https://www.dynamed.com/condition/angle-closure-glaucoma . Updated October 24, 2016. Accessed April 29, 2020.
Facts about glaucoma. National Eye Institute website. Available at: https://nei.nih.gov/health/glaucoma/glaucoma_facts. Updated March 11, 2020. Accessed April 29, 2020.
Primary open-angle glaucoma. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: https://www.dynamed.com/condition/primary-open-angle-glaucoma . Updated February 7, 2020. Accessed April 29, 2020.
Prum BE Jr, Rosenberg LF, et al; American Academy of Ophthalmology. Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma Preferred Practice Pattern Guidelines. Ophthalmology. 2016 Jan;123(1):P41-P111.
What is glaucoma? American Academy of Ophthalmology website. Available at:
...(Click grey area to select URL)
Updated August 28, 2019. Accessed April 29, 2020.
What is glaucoma? Glaucoma Research Foundation website. Available at:
...(Click grey area to select URL)
Accessed April 29, 2020.
Last reviewed February 2020 by EBSCO Medical Review Board Daniel A. Ostrovsky, MD
Last Updated: 5/4/2020

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