Cardioversion

Cardioversion is a way to shock the heart back into a normal rhythm. This can be used for many types of heart rhythm problems. The shock stops the current from causing the heart to beat in an uncoordinated way. This lets the sinoatrial node take charge and return the heart rhythm to normal. You may have to take medicines beforehand. They help protect you from problems that happen from the shock.

Cardioversion can also be done with certain medicines. In most cases, you will need to take them for a long time. Common problems are feeling lightheaded, tired, or nauseous.

REFERENCES:

Atrial flutter. EBSCO DynaMed Plus website. Available at:http://www.dynamed.com/topics/dmp~AN~T115251/Atrial-flutter. Updated February 22, 2017. Accessed January 3, 2019.

Cardioversion of atrial fibrillation. EBSCO DynaMed Plus website. Available at:http://www.dynamed.com/topics/dmp~AN~T116136/Cardioversion-of-atrial-fibrillation. Updated February 22, 2017. Accessed January 3, 2019.

Ventricular tachycardia—approach to the patient. EBSCO DynaMed Plus website. Available at:http://www.dynamed.com/topics/dmp~AN~T912540/Ventricular-tachycardia-approach-to-the-patient. Updated January 26, 2016. Accessed January 3, 2019.

Last reviewed December 2018 by EBSCO Medical Review Board Michael J. Fucci, DO, FACC  Last Updated: 1/3/2019