Medications for Chlamydia

Prescription Medications

Chlamydia is treated with antibiotics. It is important to finish all antibiotics as prescribed, even if you are feeling better. Not doing so risks reinfection.

First-line antibiotics include:

Other antibiotics include:

  • Amoxicillin
  • Erythromycin
  • Levofloxacin
  • Ofloxacin

Azithromycin

This antibiotic is effective with a single dose. If you have liver or kidney disease, this medication should be use with caution. This antibiotic is the preferred medication for use in pregnant women.

Side effects may include:

Doxycycline

This antibiotic is usually given for 7 days. It is just as effective as a single dose of azithromycin. It should not be used in children less than 8 years old or during pregnancy.

Side effects may include:

  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Sensitivity to sunlight
  • Diarrhea
  • Decreased appetite

Other antibiotics

  • Amoxicillin—alternative therapy used in pregnancy
  • Erythromycin
  • Levofloxacin
  • Ofloxacin

These antibiotics are usually given for 7 days.

Side effects may include:

  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Constipation
  • Rash
  • Cramping, loss of appetite (erythromycin)
  • Headache, lightheadedness, insomnia (levofloxacin, ofloxacin)

Special Considerations

If you are taking medications, follow these general guidelines:

  • Take the medication as directed. Do not change the amount or the schedule.
  • Ask what side effects could occur. Report them to your doctor.
  • Talk to your doctor before you stop taking any prescription medication.
  • Do not share your prescription medication.
  • Medications can be dangerous when mixed. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking more than one medication, including over-the-counter products and supplements.
  • Plan ahead for refills as needed.

References

2015 Sexually transmitted diseases treatment guidelines. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. Available at: https://www.cdc.gov/std/tg2015/default.htm. Updated January 25, 2017. Accessed February 16, 2018.
Chlamydia. Merck Manual Professional Version website. Available at:
...(Click grey area to select URL)
Updated April 2016. Accessed February 16, 2018.
Chlamydia—CDC fact sheet (detailed). Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. Available at: https://www.cdc.gov/std/chlamydia/STDFact-chlamydia-detailed.htm. Updated September 26, 2017. Accessed February 16, 2018.
Chlamydia genital infection. EBSCO DynaMed Plus website. Available at: https://www.dyname... . Updated August 23, 2017. Accessed February 16, 2018.
Mishori R, McClaskey EL, WinklerPrins VJ. Chlamydia trachomatis infections: Screening, diagnosis, and management. Am Fam Physician. 2012;86(12):1127-1132.
Last reviewed March 2018 by EBSCO Medical Review Board David L. Horn, MD, FACP
Last Updated: 2/16/2018

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