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September 05, 2017

Helping Kids Adapt to a New School

TUESDAY, Sept. 5, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Kids like familiar routines. So, when a grade change means a change in school -- from elementary to middle school, for instance -- or when a family move means a new school district at any time of the year, children are likely to experience some degree of anxiety.

Heath Tip: It's Back-to-School Time

(HealthDay News) -- The start of the school year is typically filled with excitement, anxiety and anticipation.

Health Tip: Kids and Type 2 Diabetes

(HealthDay News) -- There's a direct link between lack of sleep and the incidence of type 2 diabetes in children, recent research indicates.

Could the Zika Virus Help Battle a Deadly Brain Cancer?

TUESDAY, Sept. 5, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The Zika virus is well known for causing devastating brain defects in fetuses. But what if scientists could use that ability to do something good?

Hate to Work Out? Your DNA May Be to Blame

TUESDAY, Sept. 5, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- If a gym visit elicits more grimaces than grins, you might be genetically predisposed to dislike exercise, Dutch researchers suggest.

Throat Bacteria Linked to Bone and Joint Infection in Kids

TUESDAY, Sept. 5, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The presence of a particular germ in kids' throats may also mean they have the same infection in their bones or joints, researchers report.

Evolution Not Over for Humans

TUESDAY, Sept. 5, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers report they have spotted signs that human DNA is still evolving.

White Kids More Likely to Get Unneeded Antibiotics

TUESDAY, Sept. 5, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- White children are about twice as likely as black or Hispanic kids to get unneeded antibiotics when treated in U.S. emergency rooms for viral respiratory infections, a new study finds.

Mom-to-Be's Cellphone May Not Harm Fetal Brain

TUESDAY, Sept. 5, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Chatting away on a cellphone while pregnant doesn't appear to have a negative effect on the brain development of the growing fetus, a new study reports.

Later School Bell Could Boost U.S. Economy by $83 Billion Over Decade

TUESDAY, Sept. 5, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Delaying the start of the school day until 8:30 a.m. and letting students sleep a little longer would contribute $83 billion to the U.S. economy within 10 years, according to a new study from the RAND Corporation.

New Research Finds Value in PSA Testing

TUESDAY, Sept. 5, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Despite ongoing debate over the value of prostate cancer screening, a new review says it can indeed reduce a man's risk of dying from the disease.

There May Be a Big Medical Upside to Being Short

TUESDAY, Sept. 5, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- There may be at least one advantage to being short: a lower risk for dangerous blood clots in the veins, a new study shows.

Severe Psoriasis Linked to Higher Risk of Earlier Death

TUESDAY, Sept. 5, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- People with severe cases of the skin disease psoriasis appeared to have almost double the risk of dying during a four-year study than people without the condition, research suggests.

Drug Helped Protect Gay Teen Males From HIV

TUESDAY, Sept. 5, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A group of gay and bisexual teenage males safely used a medication that prevents HIV infection, though some failed to follow the drug regimen fully and became infected, researchers report.

Health Highlights: Sept. 5, 2017

Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay:

Is Dementia Declining Among Older Americans?

TUESDAY, Sept. 5, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Here's some good news for America's seniors: The rates of Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia have dropped significantly over the last decade or so, a new study shows.

Harvey's Wrath Still Poses Risks to Children

TUESDAY, Sept. 5, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Safety measures must be a priority for children returning to Houston and other communities affected by flooding from Hurricane Harvey, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics.

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