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May 10, 2017

Got 10 Minutes to Spare?

WEDNESDAY, May 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- If you're looking for big fitness results in a small amount of time, a twist on high-intensity interval training just might fit the bill. It also should fit into most anyone's busy schedule.

Health Tip: Make Time for Strength Training

(HealthDay News) -- Strength training uses resistance to build muscle size, strength and endurance.

Health Tip: Getting Over a Stomach Virus

(HealthDay News) -- After a gastrointestinal virus makes your stomach sensitive and you feel nauseated, avoid heavy foods that can worsen your symptoms.

Medicaid Patients Wait Longer at Doctor's Office

WEDNESDAY, May 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Most people have found themselves twiddling their thumbs while waiting too long to see a doctor, but new research suggests that scenario is more likely if you are on Medicaid.

What Harms the Young Heart Also Hurts the Brain Later

WEDNESDAY, May 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- High blood pressure, elevated cholesterol or a smoking habit early in life increases your odds for mental decline during middle age, a new study warns.

Heart Failure Patients Do Better When Sticking With Same Hospital

WEDNESDAY, May 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Heart failure patients who are readmitted to the same hospital after their initial treatment are more likely to survive and go home sooner, new Canadian research suggests.

Eat This Diet to Lower Your Odds for Painful Gout

WEDNESDAY, May 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Warding off the joint pain of gout may be as easy as eating right, a new study suggests.

Body Cooling May Help Brain After Cardiac Arrest

WEDNESDAY, May 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Cooling the body may reduce the risk of brain damage for cardiac arrest patients in a coma, a leading group of U.S. neurologists says.

Too Many Parents Say No to Helmets for Kids on Wheels

WEDNESDAY, May 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Injuries from cycling or other wheeled activities send over 400,000 kids to U.S. emergency rooms each year. Yet, many parents don't require their children to wear helmets or other safety gear, researchers say.

Common Painkillers Tied to Slight Rise in Heart Attack Risk

TUESDAY, May 9, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Commonly used painkillers such as Motrin, Advil and Aleve might increase your risk for heart attack, even in the first week of use, a new study suggests.

Life Expectancy With HIV Nears Normal With Treatment

WEDNESDAY, May 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Young adults with HIV who get treatment are living longer in North America and Europe, a new study finds.

Transplant of Insulin-Producing Cells Offers Hope Against Type 1 Diabetes

WEDNESDAY, May 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Scientists report a step forward in the plan to create a truly artificial pancreas, offering new hope to people with type 1 diabetes.

Health Highlights: May 10, 2017

Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay:

Nearly a Third of Drugs Hit by Safety Issues After FDA Approval

WEDNESDAY, May 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Safety problems emerge with nearly one in three prescription drugs after they've been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, a new study reveals.

Hope for 1st Drug Against Lymphedema, a Cancer Complication

WEDNESDAY, May 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Many cancer patients, especially those who've undergone breast cancer treatment, experience painful, swollen limbs, a condition called lymphedema.

'Groundbreaking Strides' Made in Zika Vaccine Research

WEDNESDAY, May 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Development of a Zika vaccine is proceeding rapidly, but it still will be years before such a vaccine is available to the public, says the author of a new report on research efforts.

Car Crash Rate Falls When People With ADHD Take Meds

WEDNESDAY, May 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- If you have attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), a new study suggests you would be wise to take your medication if you want to lower your chances of getting into a car accident.

New Guidelines Say No to Most 'Keyhole' Knee Surgeries

WEDNESDAY, May 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- "Keyhole" arthroscopic surgery should rarely be used to repair arthritic knee joints, a panel of international experts says in new clinical guidelines.

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