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April 11, 2017

Breast-Feeding Success Hinges on Support for Mom, Baby

TUESDAY, April 11, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Information and support can help new mothers overcome breast-feeding difficulties, a lactation expert says.

Health Tip: Should You Be Tested for Kidney Disease?

(HealthDay News) -- Chronic kidney disease may not have obvious symptoms, so it's important to know if you're at risk.

Health Tip: Recognizing Symptoms of Lactose Intolerance

(HealthDay News) -- Lactose intolerance may trigger symptoms such as bloating, gas and diarrhea after you eat or drink dairy products.

Many Docs Don't Discuss Prostate Cancer Screening Pros and Cons

TUESDAY, April 11, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Fewer than one in three men screened with the PSA (prostate-specific antigen) test for prostate cancer talked about the risks and benefits of the test with their doctor.

Household Flame Retardants Tied to Thyroid Cancer Risk

TUESDAY, April 11, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Flame retardants used in many home furnishings may boost the risk for thyroid cancer, researchers report.

Silk Clothes Won't Soothe Eczema's Itch

TUESDAY, April 11, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Although it may feel nice against the skin, new research says silk clothing offers little benefit for kids with eczema.

1 in 3 Teens With Autism Licensed to Drive, Study Finds

TUESDAY, April 11, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Many teens with autism want to hit the open road on their own, and new research shows that about one-third are following through on those dreams and getting a driver's license.

Club Drug 'Poppers' May Pose Eye Dangers

MONDAY, April 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For decades, use of the inhaled, legal high known as "poppers" has been common in dance clubs. But new research suggests the drug might pose a danger to club-goers' vision.

'Video Feedback' Program Might Help Treat Autism in Babies

TUESDAY, April 11, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A "video feedback" intervention program may help babies at risk of autism, a new British study suggests.

Many Americans Don't Know How to Handle High Cholesterol

TUESDAY, April 11, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Americans with high cholesterol are well aware of its heart dangers, but many lack the confidence or knowledge to keep it under control, a new survey shows.

The Grayer His Hair, the Higher His Heart Risk?

MONDAY, April 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Beyond signaling the march of time, gray hair may also point to a higher risk of heart disease for men, new research suggests.

A Healthy Middle-Aged Heart May Protect Your Brain Later

TUESDAY, April 11, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Healthy aging of the brain relies on the health of your heart and blood vessels when you're younger, a new study reports.

Updated Prostate Cancer Test Guidelines Now Stress Patient Choice

TUESDAY, April 11, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- In a significant shift, a key health advisory panel plans to soften its recommendation against prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening for detecting prostate cancer.

Is 'Desktop Medicine' Chipping Away at Patient Care?

TUESDAY, April 11, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians spend roughly as many hours on computer work as they do meeting with patients, a new study reveals.

Nurse! What's Taking So Long?

TUESDAY, April 11, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- When a bedside alarm goes off in a child's hospital room, anxious parents expect nurses to respond pronto.

Health Highlights: April 11, 2017

Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay:

Deep Brain Stimulation May Ease Tourette 'Tics'

TUESDAY, April 11, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Some young people with severe cases of Tourette syndrome may benefit from having electrodes implanted in the brain, a small study suggests.

Chiropractors Not Magicians When It Comes to Chronic Back Pain

TUESDAY, April 11, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Chiropractors can help ease some cases of low back pain, though their treatments may be no better than taking an over-the-counter pain reliever, a new analysis finds.

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