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March 16, 2017

Health Tip: Tune in to Hearing Loss

(HealthDay News) -- Hearing loss can affect people of any age, not just seniors.

Health Tip: Stay Focused on the Highway

(HealthDay News) -- Motor vehicles are heavy objects that often travel at high speeds. That's why it's important for drivers to always remain alert.

Serious Crash Often a Wake-Up Call for Teen Drivers

THURSDAY, March 16, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- No matter how often teenagers are told to drive safely, some might not heed that advice until they are involved in a crash, new research suggests.

America's Porky Pets Face Health Woes, Too, FDA Says

THURSDAY, March 16, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- America's weight problem extends to its pets, with a majority of cats and dogs dangerously overweight, a federal government veterinarian warns.

Taking Statins May Boost Heart Surgery Outcomes

THURSDAY, March 16, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Heart surgery patients taking statins should keep taking those cholesterol-lowering drugs, even on the day of their operation, because doing so may improve their chances of survival, a new study suggests.

Centuries of Climate May Have Shaped Your Nose

THURSDAY, March 16, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Love your nose or hate it, you can perhaps blame ancestral climates for how it looks today, new research suggests.

Home Beats Rehab for Knee, Hip Replacement Recovery

THURSDAY, March 16, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who go straight home from the hospital following hip or knee replacement surgery recover as well as, or better than, those who first go to a rehabilitation center, new research indicates.

Savvy Marketing Gets Schoolkids to Eat Their Greens

THURSDAY, March 16, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- How can public schools entice teens to use salad bars in the cafeteria? Promote them, researchers say.

Many College Football Players Lack Vitamin D: Study

THURSDAY, March 16, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Low vitamin D levels are common among college football players and may put them at increased risk for injuries, a new study suggests.

Smokers Prone to Problems After Joint Replacement: Study

THURSDAY, March 16, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Quitting smoking before knee or hip replacement surgery may cut the risk of complications after surgery, a new study suggests.

Millions of Americans Bombarded by Loud Noises

THURSDAY, March 16, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Almost 58 million Americans are exposed to loud noises at work and home, but too few try to protect their hearing, a new study finds.

For 'Preemies,' Human Touch May Be a Brain Booster

THURSDAY, March 16, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Underscoring the link between brain development and touch, new research suggests premature babies face a disadvantage compared to their full-term peers in their brain's sensitivity to gentle touch.

For Seniors, Treatment for One Eye Disease May Cause Another

THURSDAY, March 16, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Drugs that preserve vision in people with the eye disease called age-related macular degeneration might increase the risk of another eye condition -- glaucoma, a new study suggests.

Could a Blood Test Spot Autism in Childhood?

THURSDAY, March 16, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers say an experimental blood test has shown promise as a novel way to diagnose autism in children.

'Optimal' Facelifts Do Make You Look Younger, Study Finds

THURSDAY, March 16, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The time, money and pain spent on a facelift may be worth it, a small, new study suggests.

Health Highlights: March 16, 2017

Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay:

U.S. Suicide Rates Rising Faster Outside Cities

THURSDAY, March 16, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Although the U.S. suicide rate has been rising gradually since 2000, suicides in less urban areas are outpacing those in more urban areas, according to a new federal report.

Opioid Dependence Can Start in Just a Few Days

THURSDAY, March 16, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors who limit the supply of opioids they prescribe to three days or less may help patients avoid the dangers of dependence and addiction, a new study suggests.

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