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February 23, 2017

Health Tip: Slow-Cooking Food Safely

(HealthDay News) -- The slow cooker is a convenient way to whip up a healthy dinner for your family.

Health Tip: Soothing a Minor Burn

(HealthDay News) -- While severe burns require a doctor's care, most minor burns can be carefully treated at home.

Could Parkinson's Disease Raise Stroke Risk?

THURSDAY, Feb. 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A large new analysis suggests there may some type of link between Parkinson's disease and the risk for stroke.

A Stressed Life May Mean a Wider Waistline

THURSDAY, Feb. 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Days filled with stress and anxiety may be upping your risk of becoming overweight or obese, British researchers say.

Smart Kids Prone to Dumb Choices on Pot, Booze

THURSDAY, Feb. 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Smart students usually know better than to light up a cigarette. But when it comes to drinking alcohol or smoking marijuana, these same whiz kids are likely to let knowledge take a backseat to "party" time.

Common Virus May Be Linked to Heart Disease, Diabetes in Some Women

THURSDAY, Feb. 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A common virus may make some women more susceptible to both heart disease and type 2 diabetes, a new study suggests.

Can an Apple a Day Keep COPD Away?

THURSDAY, Feb. 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Eating lots of fruits and vegetables is good for everyone -- and may even help current and former smokers avoid chronic lung disease, a new investigation reveals.

Lower Back Disk Surgeries May Benefit All Ages

THURSDAY, Feb. 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- People of all ages seem to benefit from surgery for a slipped or bulging ("herniated") disk in the lower back, a new study suggests.

Ultrasound Won't Help Broken Bones Heal, Expert Panel Says

THURSDAY, Feb. 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Some doctors may order a pricey ultrasound treatment -- low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) -- to help speed the healing of broken bones.

Too Many Stroke Victims Don't Get Clot-Busting Drug: Study

THURSDAY, Feb. 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Stroke victims can be saved through the timely use of a powerful clot-busting drug, but certain groups of patients still aren't getting the medication quickly enough to help, a new study reveals.

Is a Drowsy Teen Headed for a Life of Crime?

THURSDAY, Feb. 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A new study suggests that teenage boys who are chronically sleepy in the daytime may be at higher risk of becoming violent criminals as adults.

More Evidence Ties Gum Health to Stroke Risk

THURSDAY, Feb. 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Adults with gum disease may be twice as likely as people with healthy gums to suffer a stroke, new research suggests.

Dentists at the Front Line in Diabetes Epidemic

THURSDAY, Feb. 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- You'd probably be surprised if your dentist said you might have type 2 diabetes. But new research finds that severe gum disease may be a sign the illness is present and undiagnosed.

Many Opioid Addicts in Treatment Take Narcotics on the Side

THURSDAY, Feb. 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Opioid addicts who undergo "medication-assisted treatment" are often using other narcotics before long, a new study cautions.

10 Daily Servings of Fruits, Veggies a Recipe for Longevity

THURSDAY, Feb. 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- If you want to add years to your life, 10 daily servings of fruits and vegetables may be the best recipe you can follow, a new analysis suggests.

Study Links Psychiatric Disorders to Stroke Risk

THURSDAY, Feb. 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Getting care at a hospital for a psychiatric disorder may be linked to a higher risk of stroke in the following weeks and months, new research suggests.

Health Highlights: Feb. 23, 2017

Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay:

How the Neanderthal in Your Genes Affects Your Health

THURSDAY, Feb. 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Neanderthals were wiped out about 40,000 years ago, but some of their genes live on in modern humans. And scientists are learning more about what that might mean for our health.

Belly Fat More Dangerous in Older Women Than Being Overweight

THURSDAY, Feb. 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- In older women, it's not excess weight that's deadly, but where those extra pounds collect that can shorten life, a new study reports.

NHL Veterans Pledge Their Brains to Research

THURSDAY, Feb. 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Several former National Hockey League players have joined the growing number of pro athletes who have pledged their brains to research on chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) -- a devastating brain disease that has been linked to repetitive head trauma.

As Trump Rolls Back Transgender Bathroom Rights . . .

THURSDAY, Feb. 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The controversy over so-called transgender bathroom bills continues to escalate following President Donald Trump's decision Wednesday to overturn an Obama administration directive that allowed students to use restrooms that correspond with their gender identity.

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