Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center - Health Library

HealthDay News - November 17, 2016

Public Health Campaign Cut Consumption of Sugary Drinks

THURSDAY, Nov. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A public health campaign to reduce sugary drink consumption led to a significant drop in sales of the beverages in a Maryland county, a new report says.

Health Tip: Vary Your Workout Routine

(HealthDay News) -- You can get into a rut when it comes to your exercise routine, so it's wise to add variety to your regimen.

Health Tip: Enjoy Autumn Produce

(HealthDay News) -- A slew of nutritious produce makes its debut during the Autumn months.

'Yo-Yo Dieting' Hard on Older Women's Hearts: Study

THURSDAY, Nov. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Millions of Americans have a lifelong struggle with their waistlines -- dieting, losing weight, but then gaining it back again.

Kids Can Beat 'Complex' Pneumonia Without IV Antibiotics: Study

THURSDAY, Nov. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Antibiotics taken orally are as effective -- and doubtless much more welcome -- than intravenous antibiotics for children recovering at home from complex pneumonia, a new study finds.

Study Casts Doubt on Need for Physical Therapy After Ankle Sprain

THURSDAY, Nov. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Recovery from a sprained ankle often involves some kind of physical therapy, but a new study questions the usefulness of that approach.

Can Protein, Probiotics Help With Blood Sugar Control?

THURSDAY, Nov. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Adding protein-rich or probiotic-laden foods to your diet may help control your blood sugar levels, according to a pair of new studies.

Online Calculator May Help Couples Predict Fertility Rx Success

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers say they've developed free online calculators that predict how likely a woman is to have a baby after a handful of in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment cycles.

Hi-Tech Skin Patch Might Someday Track Your Health

THURSDAY, Nov. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A new type of acoustic sensor that resembles a small Band-Aid on the skin can monitor your heartbeat and other health measures, researchers say.

Drug Stelara May Ease Crohn's Disease

THURSDAY, Nov. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- People with moderate to severe Crohn's disease who haven't responded to other treatments may benefit from the drug ustekinumab (Stelara), a new study suggests.

More U.S. Kids Getting Drug-Resistant Infections

THURSDAY, Nov. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Antibiotic-resistant infections are on the rise among American children, a new study finds.

Low Blood Sugar Linked to Death Risk for Hospital Patients

THURSDAY, Nov. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Hospital patients with low blood sugar may be at increased risk for death, a new study from Israel suggests.

Health Highlights: Nov. 17, 2016

Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay:

Pessimism May Take Unwelcome Toll on the Heart

THURSDAY, Nov. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Always seeing the cup as half empty, rather than half full, may increase the likelihood of dying from heart disease, Finnish researchers say.

Do Women Who Have Kids Later Live Longer?

THURSDAY, Nov. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In what's believed to be the first study of its kind, research suggests that women who give birth for the first time at age 25 or older are more likely to live to 90.

Intrarosa Approved for Post-Menopausal Pain During Sex

THURSDAY, Nov. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Intrarosa has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat women who have moderate-to-severe pain during sexual intercourse caused by post-menopausal vulvar and vaginal atrophy (VVA).

U.S. Surgeon General Declares War on Addiction

THURSDAY, Nov. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- America's response to alcohol and drug addiction demands a shift in thinking -- away from moralizing and toward proven medical treatment instead, the U.S. Surgeon General said Thursday.

CDC Reveals Top 5 Causes of Death

THURSDAY, Nov. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Heart disease tops the list of what's most likely to kill you or someone you love, U.S. health officials reported Thursday.