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November 30, 2015

Health Tip: The Benefits of Oxygen Therapy

(HealthDay News) -- Oxygen therapy provides extra oxygen if you have a health condition that prevents you from getting enough.

Obamacare Boosting Breast Cancer Screening Among Poor: Study

MONDAY, Nov. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- More poor women are being screened for breast cancer due to expanded Medicaid coverage under the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, a new study finds.

Health Tip: Get the Facts on Iodine

(HealthDay News) -- If you're dwelling on the subject of getting enough minerals, then calcium, iron and potassium may be more on your mind than iodine.

Minority Patients in ER Less Likely to Get Painkillers for Abdominal Pain

MONDAY, Nov. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Minority patients are much less likely than white patients to be given pain medications when they seek emergency department treatment for abdominal pain, a new study shows.

Long-Distance Running Takes Toll on Joints, But It May Be Temporary

MONDAY, Nov. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Runners who run very long distances suffer cartilage damage in their lower joints -- but the cartilage can regenerate, a small study suggests.

Weight Loss May Spare Knee Cartilage, Study Finds

MONDAY, Nov. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Losing a large amount of weight slows the loss of knee cartilage in obese people, a new study shows.

Dogs May Ease a Child's Fears

SUNDAY, Nov. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The companionship of a dog may lower a child's anxiety levels, a new study suggests.

Teens More Cautious About Sex When Parents Set Rules, Study Finds

MONDAY, Nov. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A new analysis suggests that parents who set rules and keep tabs on their teenagers may have kids who are more cautious about sex.

Fitness in Youth Can Pay Off Decades Later: Study

MONDAY, Nov. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Hitting the gym or playing field in your 20s may bring health benefits that last a lifetime, new research suggests.

Health Highlights: Nov. 30, 2015

Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay:

After Concussion Symptoms Fade, Slowed Blood Flow in Brain May Persist

MONDAY, Nov. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Young football players who suffer a concussion can show signs of reduced blood flow in the brain, even after their symptoms have subsided, a new, preliminary study suggests.

Empliciti Approved for Multiple Myeloma

MONDAY, Nov. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Empliciti (elotuzumab), in combination with two other drugs, has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat the blood cancer multiple myeloma. The drug is only approved for patients who have already been given one-to-three prior therapies for the disease.

Doctor-Patient Relationship May Suffer When Technology Takes Over: Study

MONDAY, Nov. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors who rely heavily on computers while in the exam room may run the risk of harming their relationships with their patients, a new study suggests.

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