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Mallet Finger

(Baseball Finger)

Definition

A mallet finger happens when the extensor tendon to the distal joint of the finger is stretched or torn. The extensor tendon is on the top of the finger. The distal joint is the last joint near the tip of the finger. This injury sometimes includes a small fracture of the finger.

Bones, Tendons, and Muscles of the Hand

Hand anatomy
Copyright © Nucleus Medical Media, Inc.

Causes    TOP

The most common cause of a mallet finger is when the tip of a finger is forcibly jammed into flexion or hit against a solid object. It occurs often in sports, such as baseball and basketball, when a ball hits the end of an extended finger. This injury causes the tendon on the back of the finger to be partially or completely torn. The tendon can no longer fully extend the distal joint.

Risk Factors    TOP

A risk factor is something that increases your chance of getting a disease or condition. The primary risk factor for developing mallet finger is playing a sport or activity that exposes the finger to injury.

Symptoms    TOP

Symptoms of mallet finger include:

  • Pain and tenderness at the distal finger joint after injury
  • Swelling and redness around the distal joint after the injury
  • Inability to completely extend the finger

Diagnosis    TOP

Your doctor may take an x-ray of the injured finger to look for a small fracture extending into the joint. This fracture helps diagnose a mallet finger.

Treatment    TOP

Treatment for mallet finger includes:

Ice

An ice pack should be applied to reduce swelling and tenderness.

Pain Medication

Medication may be prescribed to reduce pain. It may be over-the-counter or prescription pain medication.

Splint    TOP

A splint is usually applied to the outermost joint of the finger. It keeps the finger extended and prevents it from moving during healing.

Finger Exercises    TOP

Physical therapy may be needed after the splint is removed. These exercises will help improve strength, flexion, and extension of the injured finger.

Surgery    TOP

In some cases, surgery may be required. This may be the case if there is a total tear of the extensor tendon. It may also be needed if there is a fracture extending into the joint where the tendon has pulled a piece of bone loose.

With or without surgery, mallet fingers often result in some minor drooping of the distal finger joint. However, it should not affect function.

Prevention    TOP

The only way to prevent mallet finger is to avoid injury to your finger.

RESOURCES:

American College of Sports Medicine
http://www.acsm.org
American Physical Therapy Association.
http://www.apta.org

CANADIAN RESOURCES:

Canadian Orthopaedic Association
http://www.coa-aco.org
Canadian Rheumatology Association
http://www.rheum.ca

References:

Acute Finger Injuries: Part I. Tendons and Ligaments. American Family Physician. 2006 March 73(5):810-816.
Anderson D. Mallet finger—management and compliance. Aust Fam Physician. 2011 Jan–Feb;40(1-2):47-48.
Handoll HH, Vaghela MV. Interventions for treating mallet finger injuries. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2004;(3):CD004574.
Mallet finger. EBSCO DynaMed Plus website. Available at: http://www.dynamed.com/topics/dmp~AN~T115985/Mallet-finger. Updated June 5, 2017. Accessed August 24, 2017.
Last reviewed August 2017 by EBSCO Medical Review Board Warren A. Bodine, DO, CAQSM
Last Updated: 9/30/2013

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