CRDAMC Homepage | CRDAMC Library Phone #: (254) 288-8366 | CRDAMC Library Fax #: (254) 288-8368

Search Health Library

Is Bariatric Surgery for You?


THURSDAY, March 8, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- If you've been struggling with your weight for some time, you might be wondering if bariatric surgery is the answer.

This surgery, which involves reducing the size of your stomach to limit how much food you can take in, isn't for moderate weight loss. You need to be at least 100 pounds overweight with a BMI of 40, or 35 if you also have serious health issues. You'll also need to show that you haven't been able to lose weight with other, more conventional approaches.

Checklist: You may be a candidate for bariatric surgery if:

  • You're 100 pounds or more over your ideal weight.
  • Your BMI (body mass index, a ratio of weight to height) is over 40 or is over 35 and you have health issues related to obesity. A person who's 5-feet, 7-inches tall and weighs 260 pounds has a BMI of 40.
  • You've been unable to lose and keep off excess weight.

It's important to understand what happens after the surgery. Over the following two years, you're likely to lose between 60 to 80 percent of your excess weight. At first, you won't have much appetite. When it returns, you'll be satisfied with a lot less food than before, health professionals report.

As part of the decision-making process, explore all the risks and benefits of this life-altering procedure.

Beyond the immediate risks of any surgery, there are risks of infection, as well as vitamin, mineral and even protein deficiencies. This can happen because you're taking in fewer nutrients or your body can't absorb them as well as it used to.

To avoid serious consequences, you'll need to follow specific diet guidelines, take supplements for life, and be monitored with regular blood tests.

While bariatric surgery does help many obese people, it's not a magic wand. You have to be ready to commit to making permanent lifestyle and diet changes.

More information

The American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery has, including certain risks about weight loss surgery.

Copyright © 2018 All rights reserved.

The information in this article, including reference materials, are provided to you solely for educational or research purposes. Information in reference materials, are not and should not be considered professional health care advice upon which you should rely. Health care information changes rapidly and consequently, information in this article may be out of date. Questions about personal health should always be referred to a physician or other health care professional.

EBSCO Information Services is fully accredited by URAC. URAC is an independent, nonprofit health care accrediting organization dedicated to promoting health care quality through accreditation, certification and commendation.

This content is reviewed regularly and is updated when new and relevant evidence is made available. This information is neither intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider prior to starting any new treatment or with questions regarding a medical condition.

To send comments or feedback to our Editorial Team regarding the content please email us at Our Health Library Support team will respond to your email request within 2 business days.

Health Library: Editorial Policy | Privacy Policy | Terms and Conditions | Support
36000 Darnall Loop Fort Hood, Texas 76544-4752 | Phone: (254) 288-8000