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HealthDay News - March 19, 2019

Drinks to Help You Kick Your Soda Habit

TUESDAY, March 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Are you a sugary soda junkie? If you're ready to kick the habit, know that the answer isn't diet sodas.

The Benefits of a Home Rowing Machine

TUESDAY, March 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Rowing is often called the best aerobic exercise because it offers a total body workout and is low-impact.

Health Tip: Short-term Effects of Marijuana

(HealthDay News) -- Marijuana is a commonly used psychoactive drug among young people in the United States.

Health Tip: Treating Acne Scars

(HealthDay News) -- Treating acne scars starts by consulting a dermatologist.

Nix That TV in Your 4-Year-Old's Bedroom

TUESDAY, March 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Thinking about a TV for your young child? Based on new evidence, you might want to reconsider that.

The Moose: A Rare But Often Deadly Road Hazard

TUESDAY, March 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- It's a good thing U.S. drivers are less likely to hit a moose than a deer. Because a run-in with a majestic bull moose is a whole lot deadlier, a new study finds.

Harvesting Sperm Before Ejaculation May Help Infertile Men

TUESDAY, March 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Sperm DNA from the testicles of infertile men is often as good as that of ejaculated sperm from fertile men, according to European researchers -- a finding that could lead to new treatments for male infertility.

What Works Best for Women Struggling With a Leaky Bladder?

MONDAY, March 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- For women who need relief from bladder control problems, behavioral therapies are a better bet than medication, a new research review finds.

Stopping Aspirin 3 Months After Stent Is Safe, Study Finds

TUESDAY, March 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Heart patients who get a stent to prop open a blocked artery are typically put on a powerful anti-clotting drug and aspirin for a full year after their procedure.

Cost Puts Sports, Art Programs Out of Reach for Many Families

TUESDAY, March 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- After-school activities help develop social skills and talent, but a new report finds that many kids are priced out of participating.

World's Oldest Stored Semen Successfully Used to Breed Sheep

TUESDAY, March 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Sheep semen frozen for 50 years was as fertile as samples on ice for just one year, according to an unpublished Australian study.

A Better Cardiac Pump for People With Heart Failure?

TUESDAY, March 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A new version of an implantable heart pump could cut the risk of blood clots, bleeding and stroke in patients with advanced heart failure, according to a study funded by the device's maker.

Health Highlights: March 19, 2019

Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay:

AHA News: Emphysema May Raise Risk of Ruptured Aneurysms

TUESDAY, March 19, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- When a weakened artery wall balloons or bulges, it's called an aneurysm. For people with emphysema, the risk of that aneurysm rupturing is much higher than for those without the lung condition, new research suggests.

Can Some Children Outgrow Autism?

TUESDAY, March 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Some toddlers thought to have mild autism "outgrow" the diagnosis, but most continue to struggle with language and behavior, new research suggests.

Hormonal Therapy for Prostate Cancer Might Raise Depression Risk

TUESDAY, March 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Hormonal treatment can help control prostate cancer but may increase a man's risk of depression, a new study by Danish researchers suggests.

Tecentriq Approved for Small Cell Lung Cancer

TUESDAY, March 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Tecentriq (atezolizumab) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat adults with extensive-stage small cell lung cancer (ES-SCLC).

Can High-Potency Pot Make You Crazy?

TUESDAY, March 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The jittery, delusional potheads of the old movie "Reefer Madness" have prompted eye rolls and chuckles over the years, but a new study argues that the cult classic might contain a kernel of truth.