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September 1, 2015

Many Say Mental Health Care Is Vital, But Often Tough to Get

TUESDAY, Sept. 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Although most Americans think mental health care is important, they often believe it's expensive and hard to get, a new survey shows.

Health Highlights: Sept. 1, 2015

Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay:

Too Much Weight in Middle Age Tied to Earlier Alzheimer's

TUESDAY, Sept. 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Avoiding middle-age spread could be one way to delay the onset of dementia, a new study hints.

Health Tip: Taking Antacids

(HealthDay News) -- Over-the-counter antacids are generally safe to help ease heartburn. But, there are some people who should check with their doctor before taking them.

Health Tip: Coping With Mosquito Bites

(HealthDay News) -- Mosquito bites are itchy and annoying, and tough to ignore when they're virtually screaming "scratch me!"

U.S. Smoking Rate Falls to 15 Percent: CDC

TUESDAY, Sept. 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. smoking rate continues to decline, with just over 15 percent of adults reporting they're current smokers, a new government survey reveals.

Yesterday

Seniors Often Underestimate Their Frailty, Study Finds

MONDAY, Aug. 31, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Many American seniors seen at emergency departments overestimate their mobility, according to a recent study.

Many Teens With Chronic Illnesses Use Alcohol, Pot

MONDAY, Aug. 31, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Teens with chronic diseases such as asthma and juvenile arthritis have to manage their health carefully, yet many of them have had alcohol or smoked marijuana in the last year, a new study shows.

Could Lots of Coffee Up Heart Risks for Young Adults With High Blood Pressure?

MONDAY, Aug. 31, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Bad news for young coffee lovers: Gulping down lots of your favorite pick-me-up might raise your risk of heart attack if you've already got high blood pressure, a new study suggests.

Too Much TV Time Tied to Higher Odds for Blood Clot in Lung: Study

MONDAY, Aug. 31, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- People who sit around watching TV for hours on end may raise their risk for a sudden and deadly blockage of a lung artery, new research reveals.

Women Who Breast-Feed Less Likely to Have MS Relapse: Study

MONDAY, Aug. 31, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Breast-feeding exclusively for at least two months may help new mothers with multiple sclerosis (MS) lower their risk of relapse, new research suggests.

Too Little Sleep May Quadruple Your Risk for Colds: Study

MONDAY, Aug. 31, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- When you're run down from lack of sleep, you really are more apt to catch a cold, a new study finds.

Cold Weather May Up Risk of Stroke, Severe Heart Attack for Some

MONDAY, Aug. 31, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The onset of cold weather is clearly a bummer for beach lovers, but two new studies suggest that it may actually pose health risks for some.

Wireless Pacemaker Shows Promise in Early Trial

MONDAY, Aug. 31, 2015 (HealthDay News) --A tiny, wireless heart pacemaker showed promise in early tests and could offer an alternative to conventional, wired pacemakers, researchers report.

Proposed NYC Law May Trim 54 Calories From Kids' Fast Food Meals

MONDAY, Aug. 31, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A New York City bill to improve the nutrition of children's fast food meals could reduce the average calories and improve the nutrition of these meals, a new study claims.

Naps May Do a Heart Good

MONDAY, Aug. 31, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Taking a midday nap might be beneficial for your heart, new research suggests.

Knee, Hip Replacement Surgeries Linked to Heart Risks

MONDAY, Aug. 31, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- People who have total hip or knee replacement surgery face a greater risk for a heart attack during the first month following the procedure, a new study finds.

Doctors Rarely Discuss Religion With Critically Ill, Study Says

MONDAY, Aug. 31, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Whatever your religious beliefs, they're unlikely to get addressed in the intensive care unit, a new study finds.

Two Measures of Heart Health May Hint at Seniors' Independence

MONDAY, Aug. 31, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Seniors with a higher resting heart rate and lower heart rate variability are less able to care for themselves, a new study finds.