A person with scoliosis is checked often to check whether the curve is getting worse. Bracing or surgery may be needed. Treatment is done in people with curves greater than 20° to 25°. Surgery is done in people with curves greater than 40° to 50°.

The goals of treatment are:

  • Stopping the curve from getting worse
  • Lessening the curve with surgery
  • Limiting future health problems, such as lung disease due to restriction of a deformed chest cavity

Treatment involves:

Medicine cannot treat scoliosis.

REFERENCES:

Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at:http://www.dynamed.com/topics/dmp~AN~T116647/Adolescent-idiopathic-scoliosis. Updated June 1, 2019. Accessed July 24, 2019.

Congenital scoliosis and kyphosis. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at:http://www.dynamed.com/topics/dmp~AN~T908760/Congenital-scoliosis-and-kyphosis. Updated January 19, 2016. Accessed July 24, 2019.

Infantile and juvenile idiopathic scoliosis. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at:http://www.dynamed.com/topics/dmp~AN~T908759/Infantile-and-juvenile-idiopathic-scoliosis. Updated March 5, 2018. Accessed July 24, 2019.

Idiopathic scoliosis in children and adolescents. Ortho Info—American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons website. Available at: https://orthoinfo.aaos.org/en/diseases--conditions/idiopathic-scoliosis-in-children-and-adolescents. Updated March 2015. Accessed July 24, 2019.

Scoliosis in children and adolescents. National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases website. Available at: https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/scoliosis. Updated December 30, 2015. Accessed July 24, 2019.

Last reviewed June 2019 by EBSCO Medical Review Board Daniel A. Ostrovsky, MD  Last Updated: 7/24/2019