Unfortunately, there are no treatments available to cure scleroderma. Similarly, no treatments have been proven to slow the progression of the disease or modify its course, although a number of medications are often prescribed in the hopes that they will achieve this goal.

Goals of treatment include:

  • Treating existing symptoms, such as Raynaud’s phenomenon, arthritis, high blood pressure, or difficulty swallowing.
  • Protecting the skin from further damage
  • Supporting you and your family so that you can learn to live with the effects of scleroderma

Treatment involves the following:

Surgery is done for complicated cases of scleroderma.

REFERENCES:

Durand F, Staumont D, Bonnevalle A, Hachulla E, Hatron PY, Thomas P. Ultraviolet A1 phototherapy for treatment of acrosclerosis in systemic sclerosis: controlled study with half-side comparison analysis. Photodermatol Photoimmunol Photomed. 2007;23(6):215-221.

Localized scleroderma. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at:http://www.dynamed.com/topics/dmp~AN~T114314/Localized-scleroderma. Updated June 4, 2013. Accessed November 29, 2016.

Scleroderma. National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases website. Available at: https://www.niams.nih.gov/Health_Info/Scleroderma/default.asp. Updated August 2016. Accessed November 29, 2016.

Systemic sclerosis. EBSCO DynaMed Plus website. Available at:http://www.dynamed.com/topics/dmp~AN~T116347/Systemic-sclerosis. Updated June 9, 2016. Accessed November 29, 2016.

What is scleroderma? Scleroderma Foundation website. Available at: http://www.scleroderma.org/site/PageServer?pagename=patients_whatis#.WEhnf02QzIV. Accessed November 29, 2016.

Last reviewed November 2016 by Michael Woods, MD, FAAP  Last Updated: 5/20/2015