The doctor will ask about the woman's symptoms and health history. A physical exam will be done. This may be enough to make the diagnosis. The woman may be asked to keep track of her symptoms over two menstrual cycles. This may confirm the diagnosis.

In women who do not menstruate, blood tests may be done to check hormone levels against symptoms.

REFERENCES:

Premenstrual syndrome. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at:https://www.dynamed.com/condition/premenstrual-syndrome. Updated August 22, 2019. Accessed January 16, 2020.

Premenstrual syndrome (PMS). Family Doctor—American Academy of Family Physicians website. Available at: http://familydoctor.org/familydoctor/en/diseases-conditions/premenstrual-syndrome-pms.html. Updated July 25, 2018. Accessed January 16, 2020.

Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) fact sheet. Office on Women's Health website. Available at: http://www.womenshealth.gov/publications/our-publications/fact-sheet/premenstrual-syndrome.html. Updated March 16, 2018. Accessed January 16, 2020.

Last reviewed September 2019 by EBSCO Medical Review Board Beverly Siegal, MD, FACOG  Last Updated: 1/16/2020