The purpose of screening is to find a health problem early and treat it. Hearing screening is a test to tell if someone has hearing loss. It is given to all babies because hearing plays a role in development. There are no guidelines for screening adults for hearing loss.

All babies should be screened for hearing loss from birth to no later than one month of age. Babies who do not pass the screening should have a full hearing test no later than three months of age.

Children who are at risk for hearing loss should have at least one hearing tests by two to two and a half years of age. Children who do not pass should have a full hearing test done right away.

REFERENCES:

Hearing loss. Healthy Children—American Academy of Pediatrics website. Available at: https://www.healthychildren.org/English/health-issues/conditions/ear-nose-throat/Pages/Hearing-Loss.aspx. Updated August 1, 2009. Accessed October 29, 2019.

Hearing screening. American Speech-Language-Hearing Association website. Available at: https://www.asha.org/public/hearing/Hearing-Screening. Accessed October 29, 2019.

Screening and diagnosis of hearing loss. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. Available at: https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/hearingloss/screening.html. Updated March 21, 2019. Accessed October 29, 2019.

Stachler RJ, Chandrasekhar SS, et al; American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation (AAO-HNSF). Clinical practice guideline: sudden hearing loss. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2012 Mar;146(3 Suppl):S1-35.

Sudden sensorineural hearing loss. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at:https://www.dynamed.com/condition/sudden-sensorineural-hearing-loss. Updated November 26, 2018. Accessed October 25, 2019.

Last reviewed September 2019 by EBSCO Medical Review Board Daniel A. Ostrovsky, MD  Last Updated: 10/29/2019