Home | Mission | Ask A Librarian | Forms | UM Libraries | Contact Us 

Treatments for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD)

Managing GERD can help reduce the chance of permanent damage to the esophagus. It can also help reduce symptoms that cause discomfort and interfere with day to day activities. The goals of treatment include:

  • Reducing the amount of acid produced in the stomach
  • Strengthening the sphincter muscle
  • Reducing the amount of food, liquid, and stomach acid that flows backward into the esophagus from the stomach

Generally, GERD can be managed with a combination of medications, lifestyle changes, and in severe cases, surgery. If you have other conditions that contribute to GERD, they will need to be managed as well.

Treatment for GERD involves the following:

PreviousNext

References:

Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at:
...(Click grey area to select URL)
Updated February 19, 2015. Accessed February 27, 2015.
Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The Merck Manual Professional Edition. Available at:
...(Click grey area to select URL)
Updated May 2014. Accessed February 27, 2015.
Treatment for gastroesophageal reflux (GER) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases website. Available at:
...(Click grey area to select URL)
Accessed February 27, 2015.
Katz PO, Gerson LB, et al. Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Am J Gastroenterol. 2013;108(3):302-328.
Understanding heartburn and reflux disease. American Gastroenterological Association website. Available at:
...(Click grey area to select URL)
Accessed February 27, 2015.
Last reviewed May 2015 by Daus Mahnke, MD
Last Updated: 5/20/2015

 

EBSCO Information Services is fully accredited by URAC. URAC is an independent, nonprofit health care accrediting organization dedicated to promoting health care quality through accreditation, certification and commendation.

This content is reviewed regularly and is updated when new and relevant evidence is made available. This information is neither intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider prior to starting any new treatment or with questions regarding a medical condition.

To send comments or feedback to our Editorial Team regarding the content please email us at healthlibrarysupport@ebscohost.com. Our Health Library Support team will respond to your email request within 2 business days.


 


Louis Calder Memorial Library
P.O. Box 016950 (R-950)
Miami, FL 33101
(305) 243-6403
University of Miami
Miller School of Medicine
Biomedical Communications
P.O. Box 016960 (R-4)
Miami, FL 33101
(305) 243-6783
 
©2008 University of Miami Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine. All Rights Reserved.
1601 NW 10th Ave., Miami, FL 33136