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Sea Buckthorn

Introduction

Sea buckthorn is a tall plant with orange berries. The berries have been used to help prevent colds, lower cholesterol, and lower blood pressure. Sea buckthorn can be taken as a pill, powder, or extract. It can also be made into a tea or used as an oil.

Dosages

There are no advised doses for sea buckthorn.

What Research Shows

May Be Effective

  • High Blood Pressure —may lower blood pressure C1
  • High Cholesterol —may lower cholesterol and triglycerides D1
  • Obesity —may decrease waist circumference E1
  • Vaginal atrophy —may improve vaginal health F1

Not Enough Data to Assess

  • Chronic kidney disease A1
  • Eczema B1

Editorial process and description of evidence categories can be found at EBSCO NAT Editorial Process.

Safety Notes

It is likely safe to use sea buckthorn products and to take sea buckthorn orally in small doses for a short time. Not enough studies have been done to say whether it is safe to use for a long period. It is also not known whether it is safe to take by women who are pregnant or breastfeeding.

Interactions

Talk to your doctor about any supplements or therapy you would like to use. Some can interfere with treatment or make conditions worse such as:

  • People with heart problems should talk to their doctors before taking sea buckthorn. It may interact with their medicines.
 

References

A. Chronic Kidney Disease

A1. Rodhe Y, Woodhill T, et al. The effect of sea buckthorn supplement on oral health, inflammation, and DNA damage in hemodialysis patients: a double-blinded, randomized crossover study. J Ren Nutr. 2013 May;23(3):172-179.

B. Eczema

B1. Bath-Hextall FJ, Jenkinson C, et al. Dietary supplements for established atopic eczema. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2012;(2):CD005205.

C. High Blood Pressure

C1. Vashishtha V, Barwhal K, et al. Effect of seabuckthorn seed oil in reducing cardiovascular risk factors: A longitudinal trial on hypertensive subjects. Clin Nut. 2017;36(5):1231-1238.

D. High Cholesterol

D1. Vashishtha V, Barwhal K, et al. Effect of seabuckthorn seed oil in reducing cardiovascular risk factors: A longitudinal trial on hypertensive subjects. Clin Nut. 2017;36(5):1231-1238.

E. Obesity

E1. Lehtonen HM, Suomela JP, et al. Different berries and berry fractions have various but slightly positive effects on the associated variables of metabolic diseases on overweight and obese women. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2011;65(3):394-401.

F. Vaginal Atrophy

F1. Larmo PS, Yang B, et al. Effects of sea buckthorn oil intake on vaginal atrophy in postmenopausal women: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Maturitas. 2014 Nov;79(3):316-321.

Last reviewed July 2019 by EBSCO NAT Review Board Eric Hurwitz, DC  Last Updated: 3/30/2020