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Stay Safe On The Roads This July Fourth

2014-Jul-03

THURSDAY, July 3, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- July Fourth won't be about fireworks and fun for everyone: As many as 385 people will die on U.S. roads over this coming weekend, the National Safety Council estimates.

Yet another 41,200 crash-related injuries will require medical treatment.

"The Fourth of July is a time for celebrations -- not the emergency room," Deborah Hersman, president and CEO of the safety council, said in a council news release. "Small steps like wearing your safety belt, leaving fireworks to the professionals and keeping an eye on children in and around water can prevent deaths and injuries."

On the positive side, the NSC noted that 141 lives will likely be saved over July Fourth because of the use of seat belts.

To help keep you safe over the Independence Day weekend, the NSC offered these safety tips:

  • Don't use cell phones -- handheld or hands-free -- or other devices while driving.
  • Do not drink and drive. If you drink, have a designated non-drinking driver or leave the car at home and use other forms of transportation.
  • Be sure that children are in age-appropriate safety seats when traveling in a car.
  • Never leave a child alone in a vehicle.
  • Don't operate a boat under the influence of alcohol or drugs.
  • Make sure that children wear personal flotation devices when in a boat.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention offers http://www.cdc.gov/Features/SummertimeSafety/.

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The information in this article, including reference materials, are provided to you solely for educational or research purposes. Information in reference materials, are not and should not be considered professional health care advice upon which you should rely. Health care information changes rapidly and consequently, information in this article may be out of date. Questions about personal health should always be referred to a physician or other health care professional.