Welcome Employees

A password is required to submit a request for an internal transfer. In order to obtain the password you can check any of the following resources: Login to the employee portal, check the current issue of "Regional High Points" newsletter, contact HR, or read this week's "Daily Announcements".

 

Close

Men Who Are Obese While Young Can Pay a Price Later

2013-Apr-30

MONDAY, April 29 (HealthDay News) -- Men who are obese in their early 20s have a significantly increased risk of dying or of having serious health problems such as diabetes and heart disease by the time they reach age 55, a new long-term study indicates.

Researchers tracked the health of 6,500 Danish men from age 22 until age 55. At the start of the study, 83 percent of the young men had normal weight, 5 percent were underweight, 10 percent were overweight and 1.5 percent were obese.

By the end of the follow-up period, nearly half of the men who were obese at age 22 had been diagnosed with diabetes or high blood pressure, suffered a heart attack, stroke or blood clots in the legs or lungs, or had died.

Compared to those with normal weight, obese young men were eight times more likely to develop diabetes, four times more likely to have a potentially fatal blood clot, and more than twice as likely to develop high blood pressure, have had a heart attack or to have died, according to the study published April 29 in the online journal BMJ Open.

Every unit increase in body mass index (a measure of body fat based on height and weight) was associated with a 5 percent increased risk of heart attack, a 10 percent increased risk of high blood pressure and blood clots, and a 20 percent increased risk of diabetes.

Overall, obese young men had a nearly 50 percent risk of developing any of these serious health problems by middle age, compared with a 20 percent risk for young men with normal weight, according to a journal news release.

The findings suggest that rising rates of obesity may counteract the decrease in deaths from heart disease, and place a huge burden on health care systems worldwide, concluded study author Henrik Toft Sorensen, a professor at Aarhus University Hospital in Denmark, and colleagues.

The study found an association between obesity in young men and a greater risk of serious health problems or death by age 55. However, it did not prove a cause-and-effect relationship.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases outlines the http://win.niddk.nih.gov/publications/health_risks.htm.

http://www.healthday.com/Copyright © 2013 http://www.healthday.com/. All rights reserved.

The information in this article, including reference materials, are provided to you solely for educational or research purposes. Information in reference materials, are not and should not be considered professional health care advice upon which you should rely. Health care information changes rapidly and consequently, information in this article may be out of date. Questions about personal health should always be referred to a physician or other health care professional.